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morning sunday at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. >> now a discussion and facial recognition technology and privacy issues. after that, oregon senator ron wyden talks about global issues with the internet. and then south carolina governor immediately. -- nikki haley. not a discussion on facial recognition technology and the privacy issues that arise as it becomes more widespread this is about one hour 20 minutes. >> i am technology reporter for political. i have a great panel so i will not bore you with an introduction. to start us off we have the ftc commissioner who was sworn in on a term that expires in 2018. she focuses on fcc issues, including privacy. she served at the commission for -- she focuses on f.t.c. issues, including privacy. she would get us started off with a recap on what the ftc is working on. >> i am delighted for the opportunity to provide some into the three stocks on the topic of this panel, facial recognition technology. i will be speaking from the perspective of consumers. the mission is to prevent business practices that are anti-competitive, deceptive, or on f
. [applause] >> i am the chair of the club of science and technology member- led forum. i'm your chair for today. we also welcome our listening and viewing audience, and we invite everyone to visit us online. now, it is my pleasure to introduce our distinguished moderator who helped us all together today's panel. he is a technology veteran with operating in investing experience in technology businesses and the ceo of a premier north american publication with data center facilities, virtual private clouds, managed hosted platforms in san francisco, los angeles, and a nationwide high- performance backbone. it is also the managing partner of excellent capital, a private equity firm investing in growth stage companies. previously, was the co-founder of centera, the leading provider of wireless base stations. prior to that, he worked at national semiconductor, where he led the development and commercialization of internet networking products. he has been -- he has a degree in management from stanford, an ms from the university of central florida, and a degree in electrical engineering from
. >>> as the controversy escalates over hard knocks on the football field, a business is growing. can new technology really help prevent dangerous concussions? a "nightline" investigation. >>> juicy, ground, and made of buffalo chicken wings? it's not your grandma's recipe. the meatball guy serves up new spins on the old school classic. >>> keep it right here, america. >>> from new york city, this is "nightline" with terry moran. >> hello, everyone. thanks for joining us. tonight, a high stakes rescue mission is under way. police are staking out the underground bunker where a 6-year-old boy is being held hostage after being kidnapped from his ride home from school. it was a deadly attack in broad daylight, one raising some chilling questions about how safe children really are on the school bus. abc's jim avila brings us this report. >> just had a bus driver shot. possibly deceased. >> reporter: that was bad enough. an innocent driver shot to death. as police rushed toward his school bus in midland, atlanta, they found much worse. this bright yellow rolling sanctuary for a group of elementary school kids ha
adopt these technologies and do so in a way that is safe and secure? that, for me, is the challenge of cloud. >> very nice. that leaves just into gina because she grapples with these problems every day. >> let me start by saying i feel far more at ease now in this prestigious venue after hearing "help" and "stocks -- "hell and "sucks." i can speak far more clearly to you now. in very humble being with these folks because these folks are architects. architects of technology and architect of cloud computing technology in and of itself, so i am humbled to be here with these gentlemen. i can speak from a -- i am release a purveyor of the technology that they implemented. i can speak from my role with the city and county of san francisco and how we are leveraging cloud and the benefits we are deriving from the cloud and why we made the choices therein. certainly, as tim alluded to, the choice to go to the cloud was primarily cost-driven, economically driven, no question. but also, we began to see that the city business, the city government was changing and the role of the city government
at digital health technology from the consumer electronics show international. next, health care costs and then the international monetary fund and christine lagarde talking about the global economy. >> one can't count the times of americans say we are the best country in the world. of all the countries in the world. it's pretty good. why do we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? why do we have to assert it all of the time and what does it mean to other people who consume it? we teach people not to like this. >> author and activist and transafrica founder, randall robinson takes your phone calls and e-mails and tweets wee hours on sunday on c-span2 on booktv. >> host: here on "the communicators" is consumer electronics show international. this is part of the convention floor that you are seeing. this is only about one fourth of what is available. the largest trade show in the world, about 100,000 people attend the show every day. today with us we have andrew thompson who is president and ceo of proteus digital health. what is proteus digital health. >> guest: it
the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller
at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics and a variety of other things. i wish i had more time to talk to you and get to know you because i am sure there's a
with our immigration system. that technology world sees that people have gotten their phd from schools like mit. if you are a farmer, you would say that the migrant farmers do not have their papers. if you are checking crowdabs in maryland, the season be destroyed because you do not have workers. below thing is a mess. i have hope that -- the whole thing is a mess. >> you represent a lot of companies in silicon valley. what are you hearing from them? what is the solution to these problems? >> at it not so much a h-1 visa problem. i'm not saying it should be repealed, but it has structural problems. the real answer is residents. if you have some hot shot that got his phd in computer science from stanford, he's getting offers from all over the world. if you make them stay in limbo for six years, that's not really competitive. we want people to stay here and create jobs. that does not just in the tech field, but throughout the economy. make it easy for people to stay and grow american jobs to help our economy recover. >> what is the atmosphere for potential immigration reform in congress? >> w
. oh, please! what is invasive about a technology called, and i think i'm pronouncing this correctly rape-i-scan? [ laughter ] this is a mistake, nation. now, we'll never complete our national database of radical islamic naughty parts. [ laughter ] we'd already established a profile, young and leaning to the right. [ laughter ] plus, it was a deterrent. terrorists are known for their modesty. that's why khalid sheikh muhammad was wearing a t-shirt over that sweater. [ laughter ] fashion fans here. laugh the worst part is, without these scanners, i have no reason to laugh stay in shape any more. [ laughter ] sure, exercise will make me look better, feel better, be more attractive, but if a government employee getting paid ten bucks an hour doesn't see how i've shaved inches off my muffin top, why even fly anymore? [ laughter ] i might as well take the bus, where you don't need some fancy scanner to flash people your junk. [ laughter ] now, folks, my guest tonight a man named michael shellenberger. he is an environmental strategist who believes that we need new thinking when it comes t
the international consumer electronics show in las vegas with a discussion on government's role many technology. then president obama awards this year's recipients of the national medals for science, technology and innovation. and after that we're live as policymakers, health care industry leaders and representatives of government gather for a national health policy conference. >> congress returns today to capitol hill. the house comes in at 2 p.m. eastern to take up a small number of bills under suspension of the rules with votes at 6:30. also this week a debate and vote on a measure to require the president to submit a balanced budget to congress. over in the senate, members also come back at 2 eastern for general speeches. then at about 5:30, a vote on the bill to reauthorize the violence against women act, a domestic violence law that expired in 2011. a final vote on that could happen later this week. members of both parties are attending retreat this week. as a result, the senate will be out on tuesday and wednesday, and the house no legislative business on thursday or friday. live coverag
of the technology that will be coming from the manufacturers. are they willing -- will we be able to make the standards and produce a type of cars that people want? i wish i had a crystal ball and could tell you, the standards are further out than we've ever had. we would prefer them to be in five-year increments because it is easier to forecast five years out than 12 or 13 years out. but the rule is what it is. we don't know what's going to happen by 2025 in a lot of different areas, so we don't know what the demand is going to be and what the consumers will need and what they want. this is a very, very diverse country, a very, very diverse needs of the consumer and we need to address all of them. we can't address 90% and the 10% out. i would tell you what happens to consumers in washington d.c. and new york city are totally different than the consumers in new mexico for the mountain states are california. we need to consider all of them i would need to make sure the manufacturers are building vehicles that address the needs for all consumers. so are they willing? that is the concern. th
technology. i've heard him call it a business model. he has written a very popular vote which compares all the different business models. tell us why you feel that way. >> actually, i'm going to make a comment before that. a lot of people discuss whether or not corporations are going to use the cloud. i actually did a thing -- i had to do a talk about a year-and-a- half ago to 40 of the largest company cio's on the planet. i said the list because i knew who was going to be in the room, to all of my buddies, and ask who of those were customers. so i abrogated all of the data. anybody want to guess? out of 40 of the largest companies in the world, how many of the were using one or more of these -- there was about seven different applications, all delivered out of clout, -- cloud. that's over. best guess, not over. 38 out of 40. of the largest companies in the world. using one or more of these. when we debate the question of will corporations use the cloud, i would say they already have. we clearly are still in the early adoption days. i rattle off some very interesting stories right now of c
this cloud technology to takeoff structures down and across this down so now, i can change and 8% spent on a bunch of stuff that other people can go due to 80% i get to build applications, which power a very different experience. you think about what the car of the future might look like, it is a computer with four wheels, right? that is what it is. what they start to do with it, etc., is completely different. i'm talking about what we all conceptualize as a manufacturer. when you ask the question what will happen in the future? it is harnessing this technology to really deliver a service economy, and the companies that do this, the guys that figure this out are going to be big winners, and they are going to change the way we think of them, the way we relate to them, the way we buy from them, all of that. that is what the future holds. i see the floor. >> thank you. i think the best questions are yet to come, and we are going to turn it over to the audience. >> we would like to remind our listening and viewing audience that this is a program with the commonwealth club of california on t
of the technology sector. certainly start of companies can be from the person that decides it wants to open a dry cleaners to the latest in technology that originates and we see here at this trade show. where the greatest success seem to be was in the innovation arena, that technology arena, and it appeared to me that government was about to make a decision that was going to limit the opportunity that innovation would have for the economy. and did not expect to have much success, the allies, they were on the other side of the issue. significant players, both in congress and outside. if he was in the room, i would give him full credit for the success. the reality as it was the community the decided they were going to participate in making their position known and felt in washington, d.c. as a result, what was unexpected became the outcome, the unexpected outcome of stopping sopa and pipa was the success we had as a result of citizen participation. i hope that at victory is felt that democracy is still alive and well. a person's. of you can be heard and make a difference. that outcome was the expec
and increased expectations about what health information technology can do now -- i think it is a challenge always to balance the technology that can do these things -- we know you don't get paid to do these things but we wanted to do them -- and how those broader dynamics moved down the path and stay connected and yet balance in real time. i think that is a challenge. from the consumer viewpoint and what we know is that consumers want thatit. we did a survey about a year ago and there was broad consumer support for physicians use of electronic of records. i think it has the potential to be a game changer for them. their expectations are now beginning to change, too, in this transition phase. we saw that only a fairly small percentage of consumers have on- line access to their medical records. it is about 26% of people who also had said in ehr. for those that did, their views were very different and their experiences were very different. there were more engaged in their care and more motivated to do something to improve their care and they felt more confident in their clinician's ability to
at sharp are also betting on one unique technology to bring business back. we explain. >> reporter: engineers at sharp looked into the future and the monitors, public computers and in smartphones too. the new liquid crystal display technology is called igzo. it reduces power consumption by a fifth. only sharp owns this technology, for now. >> translator: smartphone batteries that last longer are very appealing. >> reporter: in december, a market research firm ranked smartphones with a igzo panel as the number one seller in japan. >> translator: we're getting many inquiries of products. that would certainly boost our sales. >> reporter: sharp executives are pinning hopes on this technology? >> translator: igzo is contributing a lot to improving our business. >> analysts say sharp executives may need to learn more from their past mistakes. executives invested nearly $5 billion to increase production lines for liquid crystal displays. it didn't take long for south korean and taiwanese competitors to catch up. sharp eventually lost in the price war and posted a steep decline in profits
of technology to sit in on the group. >> it might be worth while to let them know. >> good. >> okay. >> actually, additional state quarter meetings are going to be held subsequently and they will be involved in the testing and review and feedback of the citizen portal so that is going to occur. do you have any questions on this subject? >> good job. >> okay. >> keep it moving. >> yeah. this is going to go ahead and talk about the technology project. >> yeah. >> so the several of them that are critical but the most critical one is the infrastructure refresh which is the improvement. the proposal was submitted two years ago to the college, which of the committee and information technology to revamp our service this is about 7 years old. and we started this process two years ago, the city export and the city on committee of technology over sees the technology projects in the city and they do and were pushing for consolidation, as a result of that, actually, we were approved to go ahead and do the refresh of the infrastructure in conjunction with the planning department as well as the human services
to quickly adapt an use all those commercial technologies that are readily available. so you saw, at least in my opinion from a dod perspective, some scrambling, for lack of a better term, to try to counter that threat and get proactive and be ahead of the enemy. >> i want to get to the issue of technology in a little bit, but, okay, let's talk about the technology for a second. what were some of the technologies that you think are key enablers for the future, and what do you think are some of the technologies that are most terrifying in the hands of an adversary? colonel? >> there are many things that are promising that the army has it not been using as an organic piece of our formation. as we develop this multifunction electronic warfare capability there are many things inside there which are promising. there are airborne electronic attack capabilities that the army has not had, so aim very excited by its inclusion in this greater integrated electronic warfare enterprise that we're working our way through now. i am most concerned, of course, about the enemy's ability to maneuver inside o
, and globalization and technology have accelerated these changes. consider now how different our world was in the summer of 2001. leaders of egypt, iraq, and libya were entrenched in power. barack obama was an illinois state senator, and arnold schwarzenegger was a movie actor. 10 years ago, most americans had never heard of a credit default swap or mortgage-backed securities. lehman brothers had celebrated its 150th anniversary and in 2001, mark zuckerberg was captain of his high-school fencing team. borders bookstores had $3 billion in annual revenue and meanwhile, kindle something you did to a fire and nook was merely a small corner of the room. most americans knew little about osama bin laden or al qaeda. at the time, i was u.s. attorney in san francisco and i myself being out here paid little attention to those terrorist attacks that were occurring overseas. today, our world can change in the blink of an eye. the effects of that change are felt more rapidly and more broadly than ever before. consider the current economic climate. when companies fail to recognize and adapt to chang
and most prominent advocates of science, technology, and engineering, math and education, some of you know them as a member of the school state board. later this week president obama will be awarding him the national medal of science for his achievement in physics. dr. james gates. [applause] two years ago, and that just two years ago, this woman has turned around a workplace into a full-time job. please welcome janice in caroline county and melissa jones harris. [applause] within the heart of every individual is a spirit and a dignity that yearns to be recognized. 12 months ago outside, the officially recognized for the first time in 380 years, the people in a ceremony that none of us will soon forget. please welcome the tribe. [applause] thank you for being here. we're also joined by someone who found himself doing the job of a city manager. when his own home was flooded, he set aside his personal needs an extended her day and night to help the families in the cities through the crisis. mayor p.j. mayor? [applause] my fellow marylanders, the story of dr. gates, the story of janice and me
that we have read, that technology and the enhanced use of auto maition and technology have been a recurring theme for the department of building and inspection and i didn't see any emphasis and there was no mention of that in terms of the budget or at least not with any emphasis, i also note having red last year's grand jury report that the city has a very, very poor track record of implementing technology and yet, it seems to have been established that you know, hand held devices in the field, and better coordination of records from different departments that there are a wide variety of ways that technology could improve the efficiency of the staff, and the customer service, if you will. so i wondered, where that is in the budget, and what safe guards that the technology could be properly implemented. >> thank you. >> hi, again, robert, i was just wondering about the comments of the open notices of violation. and my question is how are the down stream effects not relevant? the permits that are applied for the inspection fees, the reinspection fees? i mean, if you look at the ja
saving technology. output is expected to jump five-fold by 2050 but energy conservation is a pressing issue because the industry is heavily dependent on fuel oil as well as electric power. the agreement came after a meeting in tokyo. it was tended by government and industry officials from the two countries. the technological know-how to be provided to india provides, among other things, how to convert heat and gas from steel mills into electric power. >> we hope that in the time to come we'll be second largest steel producer of the world. with this expansion, capacity is in mind, we do require better technologies, efficient technologies. we are assured with the discretion with exports, we will be able to find the right technologies for india. >> under the accord, japan will also send experts to india to help build energy-saving facilities. >>> that is going to wrap it up for biz tonight. let's get you a check of the markets. >>> residents of beijing have woken up for much of the past month under a dome of smog. they've looked out their windows to a haze of pollution. and residents of
and everybody sees it from the situation they are in so the technology world that people that got their ph.d. in to start a company here but that doesn't any sense. for the farmer you see that your migrant farmworkers don't have their papers and you are going to have to file under and if you are chucking crabs in maryland you see that the season is going to be destroyed because you don't have workers so the whole thing is a mess and i have hopes that we will have a reform effort that is really top to bottom and bipartisan. >> host: representative lofgren you represent a lot of high-tech companies in silicon valley. what you hear from them and what do you see as the solutions to these problems? >> guest: it's not so much in h-1b problem. i'm not suggesting the h-1b program should be repealed. it does need reform. does have structural problems that can lead to underpaying immigrants to the detriment of the american co-worker but the real answer is permanent residents. we are competing on a worldwide stage and if you have got some hotshot that just got his ph.d. in computer science from stanf
? is there a bubble? >> i would like to speak about the clean technology sector. there was a little bit of a bubble that emerged in 2005, 2006, 2007 time frame. what has happened since then is you see the landscape changed. there have been a lot of companies and vc's, founders, that are focused on very few investments in companies but are in it for the long run. the time and invested it takes to build a clean tech company. the difference with clean tech, there might be large facilities required, investment to build your first plant, for instance. we are seeing a change in the landscape. one thing i want to add, too, for clean tech, there are organizations like the clean tech opened that foster innovation and identify and help on to produce with that system, present their idea, put together their business plan, attract the mentors and advisers to help them build their technology. the incubators are contributing to a maturing clean tech and biotech sector -- sector. >> just a short comment. we focus in this building, a research center, on technology. some of it is near term, some of it is very long t
, from health care, from these markets that we're just scratching the surface in terms of technology applications. >> host: will panasonic still be manufacturing televisions? >> guest: i don't know. >> host: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cu
to me a technology geek's really dream, is to have all of this data available so that we can mine them in different ways and very creative ways. and i want to say, again, as someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is goin
in the plus column other than united technologies, maker of otis helicopters, down a dollar-17. you see the averages on the lower right hand of the screen, dow, nasdaq always there, gains across the board. we wanted to highlight the strengths in exchange traded funds you may own, some in your portfolio, etf, the xlk. it's moving higher by 1.5%. the health care spider up one and a quarter percent, and there's xlt, that moving up one and a third percent, all of them on a role so stocks in the aggregate looking pretty good. look at the big individual winners today. computer sciences rearing its head here, up nearly 10% making it the biggest gainer on the s&p 500. the i.t. service provider raised the 2013 forecast. we got blackberry, yes, not research in motion anymore. okay, why is it stock doing beautifully after the incredible announcement? nobody got excited about the disprks 10. well, now they are excited about the z10 sales in the u.k.. looking healthy right now. barclays making comments on that. eaton up 5.5%, better than expected q4 earnings looking at those three names. we have to
their business plan, attract the mentors and advisers to help them build their technology. the incubators are contributing to a maturing clean tech and biotech sector -- sector. >> just a short comment. we focus in this building, a research center, on technology. some of it is near term, some of it is very long term. i am glad to hear what we suggest said. i worry personally that we do not see as many long term investments as we used to. >> how do you define a long-term investment? >> good question. so, i think the question is, how speculative is this? i will use us as an example. we have a team in this building working on lithium batteries. their goal is to build a battery with 500 miles of range, for obvious reasons. we hope they will have a prototype in the feet next few years. we think -- in the next few years. we think the stars are lined up. that is a long-term investment. >> next question to all of you. michael, we will start with you. we know government is the regional -- at the regional, state, and local level can help or hinder startup companies. what would you like to see from
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
: what is it you are worried about? >> you know as this technology, and i think most of your viewers think about the unmanned aerial vehicles in terms of military, and uses across the world for the military. but, you know, we have had law enforcement agencies here in commonwealth of verge victim, sayvirginia sayingthey are inten purchasing the technology, we envision potential for abuse that goes with many of the very beneficial uses they would have you believe in. charles: okay. get -- this you know give us share examples of potential abuse, what would i be worried about? >> well, sure, i don't think that any of us thought we would live in a world where there might be a permanent state of surveillance over us, we're caught on video and cameras dozens of times a day as it is, but imagine a permanent state of surveillance under the guy guisr your own benefit. the vehicles can possess technology to see what we're doing, hear about what we're doing, and smell what we're doing, and detect thermal images, that we need it rein in the technology, and have a framework for its uses by governm
know, in the previous panel there was a lot of discussion about consumer acceptance of technology. and i think that will prove to be one of the keys to this. i will say that from toyota's view when it comes to some of the advanced technologies, for example, hybrids, we don't see that as an issue, actually. as was mentioned on the last panel as well, the total market last year for hybrid vehicles in the u.s. was just shy of 500,000 vehicles. toyota's share of that was about 65% and about 330,000 vehicles. we see hybrids as a technology that consumers have accepted and will continue to accept, and we're going full speed ahead in this realm. and i think in addition to the hybridization you'll see different internal combustion engine technologies in terms of downsizing of engines, turbo charging, direct injection. but, again, some of those require improved fuels to make maximum use of those in the vehicle systems. so, you know, it is a challenge. the midterm review which perhaps we'll talk about as well is going to be a key to make sure that the standards are still achievable. of we s
fix it. in general, the technology you are talking about is something which is broadly called cloud bursting, where essentially, is used by google and other folks, there's not one computer called there's a basilian sitting behind a thing. there is a concept called load balancing, and it has been augmented of late with the ability to dynamically spinoff new instances of server applications in response to spikes in demand. the general concept called cloud bursting allows you to do that across multiple cloud vendors, so you could do it across amazon and various other people say you could get geographic diversity and so on. people doing this extremely well, for example, would be netflix. many of you in this room i'm sure use the netflix. what they did is dynamically throw what is this is as more and more people click on movies that they want to watch. so then what they are doing is as the need scales, they then have the ability -- they pay them, and, of course, it drops off as soon as the need drops off as well. so they end up essentially paying for average demand. the techn
, the burgeoning growth of computer technology just happened to coincide with your arriving here? somebody suggested, maybe you ought to try this? i am asking how you process that. i get to that because of the success you have had, sitting on the obama commission. it is quite a fascinating journey. how do you look back at that decision at the time when you can barely speak english to study computer science? >> what is taught me is behind every closed door there is new opportunity. it is like every time life shut the door, it closes on me, high end up doing something else, and it is a new world that opens up for me. i learned in my life's journey many times that when something -- when it looks like there is no work -- no road ahead of you, behind that mountain, there is another road. there is always, if you try, you can always find a path. tavis: give me some key markers down the road, a key moments that happened for you that allowed you to get to this place with geomagic, once you left new mexico. >> first, i met an entrepreneur in city ago. i worked for him while i was studying computer s
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
of the worst technology in government. and over the last few years we have worked really hard to improve that park user's experience through the use of technology. and i want to start out before we talk a little about the app saying a if you thank yous. i really want to thank mayor lee to his incredible commitment to technology and frankly the recreation and park department. i want to thank supervisor chiu who has been a leader both in the parks world and in the technology world. sf city has really been a driving force behind helping government think about new ways, new and improved ways maybe for some of you they're old ways now. but new and improved ways for government to reach users of our programs and services. and i want to say the last special thank you to the folks from apple-liscious. this thing is awesome. this past year, the trust for public land which is a national parks organization determined that san francisco, which has 4,000 acres of open space and over 220 parks, over 15% of the city's land is open space. the trust for public land said we have the best urban park system
and players who are worried about the risk of football concussions. one company, unequal technologies, has risen to the fore with nfl endorsements -- >> i don't feel like i'm taking a risk. >> reporter: and three blunt words on every box it sells, concussion reduction technology. rob vito is the founder and ceo. >> these athletes need to take control of their own safety. >> reporter: his products, strips of composite material including bulletproof kevlar, that you glue into a helmet, but some experts are skeptical. >> the guy would have you believe it's his magical material. there's nothing magical about it. >> reporter: dave halstead is technical director at the southern impact research center, one of the leading testing labs for sports equipment in the nation. here's the problem -- the modern football helmet already offers excellent protection against direct hits, which produce sharp linear forces against the skull. halstead's testing shows the unequal strips can reduce the severity from certain angles like the front but not from other angles. and doctors believe many football concussion
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